2022 Programme, Speaker Abstracts and Biographies

Accreditation & CPD

This conference has been awarded CPD points by British Society of Hearing Aid Audiologists (BSHAA). 6 points for day 1 and 4 points for day 2, therefore a maximum of 10 points.

 

2022 'Adrian Davis lecture' will be presented this year by Professor Sergi Costafreda Gonzalez - Hearing Loss and cognition. From epidemiology to clinical trials

Abstract

Over the past 10 years epidemiological evidence has accumulated indicating that hearing loss may be a potent and so far overlooked risk factor for dementia. In this talk I will review the evidence for and against hearing loss as a cause of accelerated cognitive decline and dementia, and the potential mechanisms for this link. Ultimately, clinical trials are needed to convincingly establish if treating hearing loss can delay or prevent dementia. I will discuss the Treating Auditory impairment and CogniTion (TACT) pilot trial, of proactive hearing assessment and treatment for people with mild cognitive impairment.

Biography

I am Associate Professor in the Division of Psychiatry at UCL and Consultant at the Islington Memory Service, Camden and Islington NHS Trust. My research and clinical practice focus on diagnosis, treatment and prevention of dementia. I am interested in the impact of hearing loss on mental health and cognition. I co-authored the Lancet Dementia Commission which found that treating hearing loss could help reduce dementia cases. I am now leading the Treating Auditory impairment and CogniTion (TACT) a pilot trial that aims to find out if treating age-related hearing loss can delay or reduce the risk of dementia.

Keynote lecture: The auditory brain - Professor Sophie Scott, CBE

Abstract

In this talk, I will explore the emerging neuroscience of speech and sound processing – from perception to production. I will use models from non-human primate neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to develop models for the ways that human brains process sounds. I will consider the relationships speech and song, and the potential roles that hemispheric asymmetries in the human brain might contribute to these.

Biography

Professor Sophie Scott CBE is Director of the Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience at University College London. She studies the neurobiology of human vocal communication, from speech and sound to social interactions and non verbal emotional expressions, such as laughter. She gave the Royal Institution Christmas lectures in 2017, and was awarded the Michael Faraday prize by the Royal Society in 2021. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and the Academy of Medical Science.

Innovation and opportunity: advances in patient-reported outcomes for hearing health - Dr Sarah Hughes

Abstract

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have the potential to improve service delivery, support decision-making, and ensure the patient perspective is at the heart of hearing health research and clinical care. The use of PROs in audiological research and practice is already established; however, a deeper level of engagement is needed to optimise their use for best practice. This presentation will explore current applications and the potential benefits of PROs and examine the opportunities that PROs and the evolving digital healthcare landscape afford hearing healthcare. We will explore ongoing challenges and offer practical suggestions to promote the efficient, inclusive use of PROs for the benefit of all individuals living with hearing loss.

Biography

Dr Sarah Hughes is Research Fellow at the Centre for Patient Reported Outcome Research, University of Birmingham and a speech and language therapist with over 20 years of clinical experience in the NHS. She is an Honorary Research Fellow of Swansea University where she is a James Callaghan Scholar. Her research interests focus on the development, validation, and implementation of PROs/ePROs across a range of health conditions. She has a special interest in the measurement of perceived listening ability for real-world communication and developed the first PRO measuring listening effort in cochlear implant recipients.

Setting hearing aids for older adults: what can we learn from the literature and what do audiologists currently do? - Dr Richard Windle

Abstract

Cognitive changes occur throughout adult life during normal ageing. Some cognitive processes decline and, as they are critical elements of auditory processing, this undermines our ability to cope with complex auditory situations, such as speech in noise. Older adults with reduced cognitive processing are more dependent on the overall speech envelope for discrimination, rather than detailed timing information. Some hearing aid settings can introduce distortion to the speech envelope, which impairs speech discrimination. In particular, fast-acting compression causes significant distortion, although it tends to be the default setting of most hearing aids. Based on a literature review, we discuss the technical factors that audiologists should consider when fitting hearing aids for older adults. A pragmatic approach to hearing aid fitting is suggested. This should be considered as part of an overall optimum fitting for older adults based on all criteria, including non-audiometric factors. However, an online survey showed that many of these factors are not considered or are misunderstood by audiologists. As a profession, we could do much better for older adults, who are the majority of our patients. We should start by considering older adults as our most complex patients.

Biographies

Richard is a Senior Clinical Scientist in Audiology at the Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust, lead for R&D and Audit. He is Vice-Chair of the BSA Professional Guidance Group and a member of the BSA Research Delivery Group. He is also joint Speciality Lead for ENT & Audiology and Audiology Champion in the Thames Valley & South Midlands NIHR Clinical Research Network. He originally studied acoustics at Salford University, gaining a PhD, and worked in corporate management roles, before retraining in audiology with Masters at UCL and Manchester University, where he is currently in the final year of the HSST.

 

Keynote Lecture: Psychological approaches to supporting those experiencing vestibular symptoms - Dr Zara Jay

Abstract

The experience of chronic vestibular difficulties can be very unpleasant and can lead to a reduction in engagement in desired activities and quality of life, which in turn can impact the mental health and wellbeing of the individual. Understandably, the repeated experience of unpleasant dizziness can also lead to fear or anxiety becoming linked with it, such that even mild feelings of dizziness can trigger anxious thoughts about what is happening, whether it will worsen, and whether the person can cope. Symptoms of anxiety can also overlap with dizziness. For example, more rapid breathing can cause a feeling of light-headedness, which can be confused as a sign of an imminent dizziness episode, leading to further anxiety.

In this talk, I will present the literature on the psychological impact of vestibular conditions, the therapy treatment models devised to help break the chronic cycles, and will also discuss the themes raised in my work supporting young people.

Biography

Following completion of a BSc in Psychology at the University of Southampton, I completed a Masters in Health Psychology and a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, both from UCL. I have worked as a clinical psychologist at the Royal National Ear Nose and Throat Hospital since 2006, specialising in working with young people experiencing audiovestibular difficulties. I have also offered a monthly vestibular clinical psychology clinic at Great Ormond Street Hospital since 2020.

Non-vestibular sources of dizziness/imbalance in older adults - Dean Metz

Abstract

Older adults frequently present with reports of dizziness. Often these are of a vestibular origin but there are many other potential causes of dizziness and imbalance in this population. This is an overview of those causes which could mask or complicate any vestibular dysfunction. The attendees should have a better understanding of how to identify and respond to these confounding presentations thereby ensuring a more successful outcome for their patients

Biographies

A 1992 graduate of SUNY Downstate in Brooklyn NY, I have practiced for 3 decades with older adults on both sides of the Atlantic. I chair the ACPIVR currently, work in an NHS Trust and have a small private practice as well. My MPH from Nova Southeastern prepared me to work in policy development on the local level. I have also taught at NYU for several years.

Alternative management for dizziness-related anxiety - Mahdiyya Dharas

Abstract

As a vestibular therapist, is it our job to deal with Anxiety? Not only does research show that patients with vestibular disorders are more prone to anxiety, but interestingly, anxiety could be a significant impairment towards vestibular compensation. So, I believe the answer is Yes.

In this talk we will discuss when to tackle anxiety, simple management strategies you can implement in your clinics, and some alternative methods to reducing anxiety related dizziness including applications of Tai Chi and virtual reality.

Biography

Mahdiyya is an Audiologist specialising in vestibular diagnostics and rehabilitation. She has over ten years’ experience of working in the NHS and is currently based in Leicester. She is also Director of ‘Dizzy Ears’, a private audiological clinic based in Bedfordshire and the East midlands.

Auditory Processing Disorders: a neuroscience informed diagnostic approach and update - Professor Doris-Eva Bamiou

Abstract

Real life listening environments are characterised by a mix of complex sounds that change over time. Sound perception and understanding, i.e. “listening”, is required for communication and survival in these environments. Listening is an active cognitive process. It starts with sound transduction/amplification and encoding of frequency, timing and amplitude within the ear, binaural integration (important for sound localisation and listening in noise) and early groupings of sound in the brainstem and “auditory cognitive” processes of auditory object formation by auditory scene analysis, with matching of auditory objects to stored sound templates in a context/relevancy dependent manner (i.e. depending on the task), to achieve sound signal recognition and formulate an appropriate behavioural response. The latter part of this process is heavily dependent on language and cognitive processes, while there is a top-down effect on the incoming sensory input. Auditory processing disorders is an umbrella term to describe the clinical presentations of this process going wrong, in the absence of a significant peripheral hearing loss, and that is not solely due to cognitive or language factors. Within this context, this presentation will discuss the need for multidisciplinary assessment and careful consideration of several parameters in the diagnostic approach of APD.

Biography

Doris- Eva Bamiou MD MSc PhD FRCP is Professor in Neuroaudiology (UCL Ear Institute), Consultant in Audiovestibular Medicine (UCLH) and Sub Theme Lead of the NIHR UCLH BRC (Deafness and Hearing). She conducts translational research in Neuro-Audiology, i.e. the intersection of Audiology, Vestibular Medicine and Cognitive Neuroscience. She received the Pat Jobson Prize (British Association of Audiological Physicians, 2002), the Edith Whetnall Prize (Royal Society of Medicine, 2012) and the Thomas Simm Littler Prize (British Society of Audiology, 2017). She directs the APD advanced masterclass, MSc in Audiovestibular Medicine (UCL) and the Multidisciplinary Queen Square Dizziness Course.

Auditory Processing Disorder: latest developments and advances in assessment and management - Professor Nicci Campbell

Abstract

There is growing consensus in the field of APD, despite ongoing international debate. This is reflected in the inclusion of APD in the recent World Report on Hearing (WHO, 2021) and the ICD-10-CM (H93.25). This presentation offers a snapshot of the latest advances in both assessment and management. APD is defined, prevalence figures provided, and presenting difficulties outlined. Disorders such as auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD), hidden hearing loss (HHL) and cochlear synaptology are explored in relation to APD. Thereafter, the increases in referrals for APD assessment and public demand are considered against the caution advised by researchers and clinicians. This caution is linked to the comorbidity of APD with other disorders (making it more challenging to diagnose), limitations of tests/diagnostic criteria, and uncertainty around management. Against this background, areas of consensus are discussed, the value of a label explained, and evidence-based recommendations made regarding the assessment and management of APD. The take home messages are: (1) audiological APD testing should not be done in isolation – a multidisciplinary approach is needed, (2) it is important to recognize the limitations of test/diagnostic criteria, and clearly document tests and criteria used, (3) a ‘label’ or diagnosis is necessary to secure support and funding for those affected and develop service provision, and (4) management should have functional impact, i.e., make a difference in real life, in accordance with the recent World Report on Hearing (WHO, 2021).

Biography

Nicci Campbell is a Professorial Fellow (Enterprise) at the University of Southampton. In addition to her research, lecturing and clinical audiology role (NHS cochlear implant caseload), she is the service lead for both the self-funded cochlear implant service and interdisciplinary auditory processing disorder (APD) Service. She is currently the chair of the British Society of Audiology’s APD Group and advisor to (C)APD Ireland. In 2016 she was awarded the Ruth Spencer Prize for her contribution to Audiology and APD. She has also received a BSA Award for ‘Outstanding Contribution to the BSA and Wider Audiology Community’.

Tired of Listening: understanding the relationship between hearing loss, hearing aid use and daily-life fatigue - Dr Jack Holman

Abstract

Fatigue is not just a momentary negative experience; it can have a detrimental impact on well-being and other health related outcomes. For decades, there has been anecdotal evidence that hearing loss can cause increased feelings of fatigue. Intuitively, we assume that increased cognitive effort, due to difficulty hearing, results in a drain on finite cognitive resource and subsequently fatigue. However, we now know that the picture is not so straight forward, with factors such as motivation and even emotion playing a role. Research into hearing loss, hearing aid use, and fatigue has provided interesting, and at times inconsistent, results.

In this presentation, I will discuss how better appreciation of the dimensionality, duration, and various causes of fatigue can help clarify the matter. I will provide evidence from a longitudinal study using self-report questionnaires that first-ever hearing aid fitting can improve listening fatigue and listening effort. I will also discuss daily-life fatigue as distinct from listening fatigue, and how daily-life activity could play a crucial role in the well-being of people with hearing loss.

Biography

Jack Holman is a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Nottingham Hearing Sciences – Scottish Section, funded by the Medical Research Foundation. Following Psychology and Brain Imaging Methods degrees from the University of Glasgow, he moved into hearing science at the MRC Institute of Hearing Research and completed a PhD at the University of Nottingham School of Medicine. His research interests include listening effort and listening fatigue, the affective experience of listening situations, social-emotional well-being, and the optimisation of outcomes after hearing aid fitting.

The influence of motivation on listening effort - Dr Rebecca Millman

Abstract

Understanding speech in challenging circumstances, for instance, in a noisy environment, often requires extra mental effort i.e. listening effort. Listening effort is a frequent complaint of people with hearing loss, and has a high impact on daily functioning.

This talk will provide an overview of the theoretical role of both listening demands and motivation in the regulation of listening effort.

I will then present the results of our recent systematic review and meta-analyses (Carolan et al., 2022), which quantified the effects of motivation on listening effort, and also considered the quality of the existing evidence for a role of motivation in regulating listening effort.

Biography

Rebecca Millman is a Lecturer in Audiology in the Manchester Centre for Audiology and Deafness, the University of Manchester, and Chair of the British Society of Audiology Special Interest Group for Cognition in Hearing. Her research, which has been funded by the MRC, Wellcome Trust, NIHR and the Alzheimer’s Society, has used psychoacoustics and cognitive neuroscience to contribute to our understanding of how our brains respond to sounds that provide important cues for human communication. She is particularly interested in the effects of hearing loss on the auditory brain and understanding how cognitive decline interacts with hearing and communication.

GN Hearing

Abstract

Introduction: Data is presented from a retrospective analysis of self-report measures from 125 patients attending our service between 2009 and 2012. The results are discussed along with the implications for clinical practice.

Methods: Patients were included if they had normal/mild hearing loss on the good ear and a severe/profound or ‘dead’ ear on the other side. Scores were taken from the Hearing Handicap Inventory (HHIA) and compared with the Speech, Spatial and Sound Qualities (SSQ) questionnaire), Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI).  Multiple regression analysis was undertaken to determine which factors are the greatest predictors of hearing handicap.

Results: There were significant correlations between HHI and depression, anxiety, all three subscales of the SSQ, APHAB B and R and THI. Multiple Regression analysis indicated that depression and SSQ Qualities were the greatest predictors of hearing handicap.

Discussion:

  • How the results should inform management
  • Preoperative advice should be focused not just on localisation, more on BGN and enjoyment of music/social situations
  • Solutions for SSD including use of a Bluetooth microphone as an alternative to CROS and a suggested protocol for this

Biography

Rachel Knappett has more than 20 years’ experience in Audiology and is currently Head of Adult Auditory Rehabilitation at Addenbrooke’s Hospital. She also co-directs a private Audiology practice specialising in complex patients. As a Specialist Audiologist, she has extensive experience as the lead Audiologist for the tinnitus, teenage hearing services and single-sided deafness clinics. She is the current chair of the East of England professional tinnitus network and is on the Cambs Tinnitus Support Group committee. She has previously undertaken charitable work with the international Nepal fellowship supporting their ‘Ear Camps’ and is also a mum of three.

Signia supporting you - including help with IQIPs 2

Abstract

At Signia, we strive to support, inform and educate everybody interested in ‘audiology and hearing’. Improving access to all is key for us, meaning that anyone who engages with Signia can take away key learnings and/or benefits – regardless of whether you are familiar with Signia products (or not).

Hear about our brand new ‘Signia Cultivate’ CPD accredited educational courses – designed to be brought directly to you, in your departments. These include topics such as ‘difficult to fit hearing losses’ and ‘patient centred care’. You will also hear from Signia’s dedicated Public Sector Product Marketing Manager, who will discuss the tailored support packages available to your Trust. Last but by no means least, the session will address the topic of how Signia can support you towards achieving your IQIPS 2 accreditation.

Biography

Julia obtained her BSc and MSc degrees in South Africa before moving to the UK, where she worked in paediatric audiology for 13 years. In 2020 Julia joined Signia and as ‘Head of Audiology’, with the aim to extend and broaden audiology support within communities.

Alison is an NHS trained Audiologist who has been part of the Signia team for 7 years. Taking on a new role in 2021, Alison is now a Product Marketing Manager, solely dedicated to the Public Sector – with a focus on supporting Trusts in their efforts to promote excellence in patient-centred care.

 

Audiology led wax management: a round table discussion

Abstract

During this session, we will have a round-table discussion with a panel of experts from the Audiology industry. These experts will share how they have incorporated wax management into their service-delivery pathways, including their reasons for doing so. We will hear about the challenges they faced and how they have overcome them.

In addition, we will hear about how this paradigm-shift in wax management impacted clinic time, clinic space and patient journey costs.  Our panel will talk you through elements you may need to consider when incorporating wax-related services into your department, including; training, clinic layout, health & safety considerations and will also offer advice on how to tackle these potential challenges. We will ask our panel about their preferences regarding wax management tools, as well as new products that are being trialled and how the departmental staff have adjusted to these different/new methods.  Lastly, the panel will discuss what their patients think about having new wax removal services within in their audiology department.

Biography

Julia obtained her BSc and MSc degrees in South Africa before moving to the UK, where she worked in paediatric audiology for 13 years. In 2020 Julia joined Signia and as ‘Head of Audiology’, with the aim to extend and broaden audiology support within communities.

Joining Julia will be joined by a panel of experts including:

  • Kath Lewis – Head of Audiology at Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust.
  • Claire Benton – Head of Audiology at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust.
A game-changing appraoch to preserving gain and preventing feedback in Oticon Optim

Abstract

Every once in a while, a technological innovation comes along within audiology that changes the daily life of hearing aid users and the hearing care professionals who fit them. This presentation introduces the use of Spectro-Temporal Modulation as a different and very effective method to prevent feedback in hearing aids. As a result, we also solve the often invisible problem of multiple gain reductions over the course of a day, a side effect of common traditional feedback management. Data will be presented that supports being able to preserve gain effectively, leading to more access to crucial speech cues, calculated using the Speech Intelligibility Index (SII). The presentation will also highlight how gain reduction as a feedback management strategy can be detrimental for almost all hearing aid users, not just a small group needing more gain in high frequencies. For a hearing care professional, it is difficult to pinpoint when feedback management is the problem, because the complaints could be, “I can’t hear much of a difference”, or “I can hear the hearing aids turning down, but I don’t know why”. In this session, we explore the unforeseen consequences of traditional feedback management – gain reductions – and how to solve them.

Biography

Susanna Løve is a Danish-American audiologist and the Director of Audiology at Oticon. She holds a master’s degree from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark in 2007 and a clinical doctorate in Audiology from the US. She spent 8 years in American private practice before joining the Centre for Applied Audiology Research at Oticon headquarters in Denmark in 2014. In her current position, she is responsible for the audiological and clinical direction for Oticon and leads a team of clinical research audiologists and students. She takes a special interest in the changing landscape of audiology and how to promote best practices within our field.

When can I stop averaging? The advantages and limitations of Bayesian averaging, artifact rejection, residual noise values and Fmp calculations. - Robert McLeod, Natus

Abstract

Join us as we discuss the principles of time effective artifact rejection and the effects of Bayesian averaging. We will also look at the evidence surrounding the use of objective calculations (Fmp/RN) with examples of when to use them and when to ignore them!

Biography

Rob holds the position of UK clinical trainer for Natus Medical. Rob covers training and clinical support for the entire hearing & balance product portfolio. He has used Natus equipment for over 10 years in both NHS and private clinical roles. Rob has had the privilege of being invited to speak at both British and American Academies of audiology as well as multiple UK universities.

Criteria and outcomes of BCI and MEI devices - Andrew Soulby

Abstract

There are a myriad of bone conduction based hearing devices, most of which are available via NHS England. The function and performance characteristics of these devices can vary significantly, as can the types of hearing loss they are suitable for. This makes it difficult to know exactly who might benefit versus a traditional hearing aid and what type of device might be most suitable for them.

This session aims to take listeners through a practical evidence-based tour of bone conduction amplification theory, as well as the current state of the art. We will explore the pros, cons and expected outcomes for the various devices available for different hearing loss configurations, and touch on important topics such as the health economics of bone conduction implantation.

The session will be primarily aimed at practising audiologists who may have no or limited experience with bone conduction implants and wish to learn more in order to further their professional development and be able to better manage their patient caseload.

Biography

Andrew has a background in Neuroscience (MSci 2008 University of Nottingham) and Mathematical Biology (MSc 2011 University of Warwick). He completed the NHS Scientist Training Program in 2017 and is a registered Clinical Scientist (Audiology). Since 2018 Andrew has worked clinically on the adult Hearing Implant team at St. Thomas’ and also as a Clinical Researcher. In 2021, Andrew became the Principal Clinical Researcher at St. Thomas’ and is currently involved in delivery of several clinical trials. Andrew is also the NIHR Audiology Research Champion for South London, and his main research interests are the optimisation of auditory implant outcomes.

Keynote Lecture: Supporting quality of life through sensory health in people with dementia - Professor Iracema Leroi

Abstract

Hearing and vison support to improve outcomes for people with aging-related cognitive impairment and dementia.

Hearing and vision support and rehabilitation are potential means to improve outcomes, such as quality of life for older adults with dementia and their care partners. Findings from the EU SENSE-Cog research program (www.sense-cog.eu), which explores the interplay between aging-related hearing and vision impairments and dementia will be presented, including a pilot study and subsequent large-scale clinical trial of hearing and vision rehabilitation in people with dementia, which took place in several sites in Europe will be presented.

Biography

Iracema Leroi is a clinical academic at the Global Brain Health Institute, Trinity College Dublin (www.gbhi.org) and a consultant geriatric psychiatrist. Iracema has a particular interest in clinical trials in dementia, leading Dementia Trials Ireland, a new infrastructure to increase trial capacity in Ireland. Iracema trained in Canada and in the US, at Johns Hopkins University, and until recently, was Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Manchester. She is currently the Chief Investigator of EU-wide H2020 SENSE-Cog programme (www.sense-cog.eu) which is investigating the links among age-related hearing, vision and dementia and the impact of improving hearing and vision in dementia.

Cloud-based follow up - Adam Beckman

Abstract

After preparing for around a year, in April 2020 University Hospitals Plymouth (UHP) went live with the Remote Assist system for remote follow-ups. As the system involves the manufacturer’s web-system, patients must give informed consent for this. This consent, and the web-system, allows for simple analysis of the data. The application of the system to improve patient care won the 2021 Chief Scientific Officer’ Excellence in Healthcare Science award.

With over 2000 patients who have consented for this system, the service has a rich source of data. The presentation will cover: the basics of how it works; lessons learned following implementation; data on patient satisfaction with the system based on a service evaluation; data on outcomes of remote assistance care; data on the time saved for patients and staff by using Remote Assist; and plans for further evaluation and developments.

Biography

Adam is the Head of Audiology Services, University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust (UHP), where he has been for 17 years, following stints at the RNTNEH and Whipps Cross University Hospital. He is a Past President of the BAA. Adam’s primary focus has always been adult rehabilitation, although he still works clinically with children and balance services.

Recently, he has lead the service through all the changes brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, and they won the Healthcare Science Award for how they embraced remote working.

 

Patients travelling to the CI clinic? Not so much anymore - Professor Helen Cullington

Abstract

People with cochlear implants need lifelong care to achieve their best outcomes. The COVID-19 pandemic facilitated a widespread rapid introduction of remote care in most healthcare settings. Technology also improved considerably, e.g., online meetings, Zoom, Teams, and enhanced autocaptioning. Some cochlear implant companies introduced new remote care tools. Around a third of the public feel that increased use of technology made sense during COVID-19, but was ‘not for the long term’ [1]. Some sectors of the population are more likely to be digitally excluded than others. More than 11 million people lack basic digital skills to use the internet effectively[2]. Sajid Javid described the NHS as a “Blockbuster healthcare system in the age of Netflix”[3], although the NHS Long Term Plan promises that every patient can be offered digital-first primary care by 2023/24[4]. Almost all aspects of cochlear implant care can be done remotely (not the surgery … yet!). But Just because it is technically possible does not mean it is the right thing for the patient.

We need to codesign care with patients for patients – asking patient preferences for how they receive care, and helping them to make the right decision. Accessing care remotely may change the ‘work’ of being a patient; being required to be empowered could actually be a burden[5]. 1. The Health Foundation, Securing a positive health care technology legacy from COVID-19. 2021. 2. NHS Digital, Digital inclusion for health and social care. 2019. 3. Gibbons, A., Javid likens NHS to defunct video store Blockbuster in ‘the age of Netflix’, in The Independent. 2022: online. 4. NHS England, The NHS Long Term Plan, N. England, Editor. 2019. 5. Gilbert, A.W., et al., Use of virtual consultations in an orthopaedic rehabilitation setting: how do changes in the work of being a patient influence patient preferences? A systematic review and qualitative synthesis. BMJ Open, 2020. 10(9): p. e036197.

Biography

I am an audiologist at the University of Southampton Auditory Implant Service and Chair of the British Cochlear Implant Group. I am captivated by cochlear implants and the use of technology to improve people’s lives. I have worked for 28 years in six cochlear implant centres around the world, and completed my PhD at University of California, Irvine. The BCIG is committed to increasing access to and awareness of cochlear implants in the UK and beyond.

Bamford Lecture: Neuroscience of hearing and languages: the importance of early access to sound - Dr Paul Johns

Abstract

In children with profound hearing impairment, it is well known that early bilateral cochlear implantation produces the best outcomes… but why? In the annual Bamford lecture, Dr Johns will explore the neuroscience of hearing and language. He will discuss the sequential development of sensory, cognitive and language pathways – and emphasise the importance of early access to sound to harness the remarkable plasticity of the infant brain. The session will provide an update on the functional anatomy of the auditory pathways, primary auditory cortex, cortical language areas, and their white matter connections. Basic mechanisms of brain development will be discussed, including the concept of critical and sensitive periods, and the competitive process by which neural connections are formed, and their reliance on sensory input in the first few months of life. The presentation’s aim is to provide a theoretical framework to understand the fundamental importance of early access to sound – and to explain why ‘earlier is better’.

Biography

Dr Paul Johns (BSc, BM, MSc, FAcadMEd, FRSB, FRCPath) is a consultant neuropathologist and reader in clinical neuroanatomy at St George’s Hospital in London. He completed his specialist medical training at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery and UCL Institute of Neurology (Queen Square) and has been an NHS consultant since 2011. Dr Johns has expertise in all aspects of structural, functional and clinical neuroanatomy, and a particular interest in the auditory brain and the functional anatomy of hearing, language and cerebral plasticity

What's in your toolkit? Resources for managing tinnitus in children - Claire Benton

Abstract

While more centres are beginning to ask children whether they experience tinnitus, feeling confident in managing those children can take us out of our comfort zone. Over the years of developing the service in Nottingham, a large resource base has been developed to support the needs of both patients and clinicians in managing tinnitus, anxiety, and the impact these can have on a child behaviourally. Bring your phone or tablet, as you will be given links throughout the talk, allowing you to download resources directly, and an Amazon shopping list for all books mentioned in one handy place. All this with top tips on how to use them to support your clinics and make you feel more at ease.

Biography

Consultant Clinical Scientist (Audiology), Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust.

Claire has worked within Audiology for over 25 years. Most of this time has been within the Audiology department at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. She has always worked clinically within paediatrics, previously being the Clinical Lead for Paediatrics for 11 years, and more recently Head of Service for the department since 2018. Having been part of the British Society of Audiology’s working group that developed the joint BSA/BTA Guidelines for assessing and managing tinnitus in Children, Claire has specialised in working with children with tinnitus and hyperacusis for the past 10 years.

Improving your newborn ABR assessment - Jason Smalley

Abstract

This session will offer tips and tricks on how to improve your strategy for ABR testing of babies and young infants, to help maximise what you get from each appointment.

Biography

I’ve been a qualified audiologist for over 12 years, starting in general audiology. I now specialise in the electrophysiological assessment of hearing in adults, children and babies. I am also the current BAA Board Lead for Service Quality.

Assessing children behaviourally, when to think outside the box and when to stay inside! - Keiran Joseph

Abstract

This session will discuss some ideas and strategies that can be implemented to increase the success of behavioural hearing assessment of children.  The session will discuss the adaptations to practice that we can make that are ‘inside the box’ and also some that are a little more creative and require thinking ‘outside the box’.

Biography

Keiran Joseph is the Clinical Lead for the Paediatric Audiology Service at Guys and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust in London, one of the largest public paediatric audiology services in the UK. He is a registered Clinical Scientist, having completed a BSc in Audiology at the University of Bristol in 2011, followed by the Scientist Training Programme (STP) and Neurosensory Sciences MSc at the University of Manchester, with a clinical placement at Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust in 2014.  Keiran is a Board Director at the British Academy of Audiology. He sits on the NHS England Expert Reference Group for Hearing Checks in LD and Autism, and is a section editor for ENT & Audiology News.  Keiran regularly presents his work at courses and conferences, with recent topics focusing on audiological assessment of children with complex needs, early intervention and remote care in audiology. Keiran has also recently completed a Master’s in Business Administration (MBA) at the University of Kent.

Understanding the developing auditory system@ a new hearing technology to support the learning and communication for children

Abstract

Brain development is a lot like making a tower out of building blocks, where the wiring for the brain for higher level processes builds on a foundation of lower-level processes. For example, consider a child and the way they learn new things. A child’s language development is critically dependent on established sensory and perceptual development. It is no surprise that the type and quality of auditory input children are exposed to really help to shape their brains and behaviour. For children with hearing loss, it is important to provide sound through well-fit hearing technology that will support their development. In this presentation, I will discuss the development of children with hearing loss, as well as how hearing technology and sound processing should be designed to best support their needs. I will introduce the latest BrainHearingTM technology which is designed to best support the developing auditory system and present a couple of clinical studies that highlights the benefits of this hearing technology for children.

Biography

Elaine Ng, PhD, is a Principal Researcher at Oticon A/S, Denmark and an Adjunct Associate Professor in Cognitive Hearing Science at Linköping University, Sweden. She holds a Master’s degree in Audiology from the University of Hong Kong, where she worked as a clinical/research audiologist after graduation. She then moved to Sweden to pursue a PhD at Linköping University. The title of her thesis is “Cognition in hearing aid users: Memory for everyday speech”. In 2017, Elaine joined Oticon A/S. Her research focuses on speech perception and cognition in people with hearing loss and cognitive benefits of hearing aid use.

GN Hearing

Abstract

Music is ubiquitous and intrinsically linked to human culture. Research has shown the benefits of music can lessen anxiety, improve sleep quality and mood, and has an impact on overall mental health. Hearing aids and music pose a unique challenge to audiologists and our patients. Whether the patient is a musical aficionado or just enjoys casual music listening, today’s standard fitting flows may not be taking everything into consideration. This talk will explore a few of the challenges that audiologists and music enthusiasts are faced with and how to optimize fittings moving forward.

Biography

Megan Quilter, Au.D is a Lead Audiologist with GN Hearing A/S, Global Audiology team and primarily focuses on research, adult and pediatric amplification and cochlear implants. Her background includes neuro-vestibular audiology, clinical pediatrics, amplification, and pediatric and equipment manufacturing. Dr. Quilter effectively communicates with a variety of levels of customers, colleagues and patients. Dr. Quilter currently holds a Doctorate of Audiology from the University of Florida, Gainesville and resides in Chicago, Illinois with her family.

All you wanted to know about Osia but were afraid to ask: panel discussion

Biography

Lewis Vaughan Jones is a newsreader and journalist for the BBC. He presents the BBC News Channel in the UK and anchors BBC World News – the international news channel watched by over 100 million people every week.

Lewis has interviewed leading global figures like Donald Trump and Boris Johnson and has covered some of the biggest news stories on the planet. As a former political correspondent in Westminster, he reported on General Elections, leadership races and, of course, Brexit. In the United States he covered the Obama administration from Washington DC.

Alongside TV presenting, he is an event host, panel moderator and director of a production company.

Lewis uses a Cochlear™ Osia® acoustic implant and works to increase awareness and reduce the stigma of hearing loss.

Six Flavours of Frequency Lowering - Rob McLeod, Natus

Abstract

Join us as we take a dive into the wonderful world of verifying frequency lowering. Six types of frequency lowering; all explained, verified and visualised in Otosuite. What flavours of frequency lowering do you fit in your clinic? Who is it for? How to visualise it and how much is enough?

Biography

Rob holds the position of UK clinical trainer for Natus Medical. Rob covers training and clinical support for the entire hearing & balance product portfolio. He has used Natus equipment for over 10 years in both NHS and private clinical roles. Rob has had the privilege of being invited to speak at both British and American Academies of audiology as well as multiple UK universities.

2022 Programme Overview

The BAA Scientific Programme Committee is delighted to offer you  a conference line up which we believe will provide two days of superb presentations and education that will have clinical impact.

Once again, we bring you three parallel tracks, with a mix of keynotes, invited speakers and free papers, and a whole track of technology, product, and software updates.

Every year, we strive to ensure that you, our delegates, leave the event with a clear idea of how to implement what you have heard in your own departments, practice, or career. We have doubled down on that commitment this year and have strong clinical leaders and professionals providing practical, best-practice, presentations in many areas. There really should be several sessions that will appeal and inform your practise.

There will be updates from experts in clinical practice, research, policy, service innovation and neuroscience.

They will provide key sessions on setting hearing aids for adults, outcome measures, cognition and hearing loss, paediatric assessment and early access to sound, paediatric tinnitus management, vestibular assessment and management and non-vestibular sources of dizziness, some cochlear implant presentations, and a dementia keynote. We have included a session on Auditory Processing Disorder, due to popular demand, and more information on service innovations, as our professionals continue to evolve their services.

 

Thursday 13th October

Following a welcome from President Kath Lewis, we are delighted that Dr Sergi Costafreda Gonzalez, Consultant Psychiatrist & Associate Professor at Camden & Islington Foundation Trust | Division of Psychiatry, UCL, will deliver the Adrian Davis lecture. After the first coffee break, we continue in the main hall with our second keynote lecture, delivered by Professor Sophie Scott. Sophie was a popular presenter from 2021 who we just had to invite back. Professor Scott CBE, is Director, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, and will provide a lecture on the auditory brain – from sound to meaning

We then break into our parallel tracks. In the main hall is a session on adult audiology, looking at patient-reported outcomes, and then the setting of hearing aids from literature and reality. In the second track, an APD session takes place with a diagnostic approach and updates on the latest developments in the assessment and management of APD.  Our platinum sponsors provide the presentations for the third track, providing invaluable information on the latest technology, software, and programmes available for patients.

Following poster viewing, a spot of lunch and exhibition visiting, BAA members are invited to the Annual General Meeting. Hear from the President and Board of Directors about the past 12 months and the plans for the year ahead. There’s usually a bottle of bubbly hidden under someone’s chair as a surprise, to thank you for attending!

Our third keynote speaker takes the stage after lunch. Dr Zara Jay, Clinical Psychologist, University College London Hospital and Great Ormond Street Hospital, will present on psychological approaches to supporting those experiencing vestibular symptoms.  Dr Zara Jay was a hugely popular presenter in 2021, with many asking us to invite her back. This year Zara starts our vestibular session in the main auditorium. We then break into a balance track, with two practical sessions from a vestibular specialist physiotherapist and an audiologist who specialises in the vestibular field in the NHS and private practice. In the parallel track, we look at the relationship between hearing loss, hearing aid use, and daily-life fatigue, and a session on listening effort. We finish the day with six free paper sessions, where you, or your colleagues, have the opportunity to present your latest research and clinical findings.

While the day of presentations ends here, we would like to invite you to join us again at our evening venue for a party night. Venue will be confirmed shortly, but your two-day ticket includes entrance, a welcome drink, and some food and fun!

 

Friday 14th October

The second day at conference starts a little differently this year, with parallel sessions running. Four free papers will be chosen from your abstract submissions, followed by talks on implants and paediatric tinnitus assessment and management.

Following the refreshment break, our fourth keynote speaker is Professor Iracema Leroi, Associate Professor of Geriatric Psychiatry, Global Brain Health Institute at Trinity College Dublin. Professor Leroi will talk to us about supporting quality of life through sensory health in people with dementia.

Following the keynote, you have the choice between a session on service innovation in audiology and cochlear implantation, a paediatric assessment session with two BAA Board Directors or the sponsor track before lunch, and our final exhibition and poster viewing session.

Our final afternoon session goes to one track for our awards and prize-giving session and our last conference keynote. Dr Paul Johns, a consultant neuropathologist and reader in clinical neuroanatomy at St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, closes the conference with our annual Bamford Lecture: Neuroscience of hearing and language: the importance of early access to sound.

New BAA President Samantha Lear will officially end the 2022 conference with her closing remarks.

As in previous years, we are delighted that our Platinum sponsors contribute to our programme with their own talks over the two days, details of which will be released soon.

 

With thanks to our Platinum Sponsors